Tramontane

2:30 minutes, cut-out stop motion, 2018

 

In November 2018, a vibrant conversation with a fellow artist initiated a unique art project in the form of a video-letter correspondence. Following this interaction, we set up a mutual framework of tasks, using filmmaking processes to document our process. Our common goal was to depict and investigate our differing points of view on a dialectic: Life and Death. The outcome of our correspondence was rendered into two separate films. One film for life and one for death, each individually created by a different artist. Each film’s content was subdivided into five chapters, or ‘video-letters’.

My task was the film on death and the five different aspects I chose for my video-letters explored the ambiguous duality of the life-death schema:

-The ‘corporeal engagement’ in time’s swift passage as an analogy for the notion of existence itself.

-The blurry margins of the life-death duality.

-Death as an interrelated persistence of the memory of life itself.

– Understanding death as a potentially positive force.

– The everchanging character of death; the role of catharsis in the context of pain, both mentally and physically.

Chapter 2/5: Tramontane

Tramontane is my second chapter of the video letter series of Death. Tramontane is the winter wind from the north. It is the most abysmal, the most vicious of all Mediterranean winds. It is a strong dry cold wind which is similar to the mistral but contains all negatives of the mistral without the one positive, the cleaning of the air. It’s continuous monotonously howling sound disturbs the human psyche.

” The wind which comes across the mountain will drive me mad. ” Victor Hugo

Monotony can cause madness. Monotony is the absolute banishment of the human soul, a martyrion, an exile into a purposeless, infertile, nonharmonic existence. If life contemns one into a ‘monotony existence’, death could be the catharsis!

 

 

 

 

 

Tramontane, looped excerpts, 2018

Tramontane, looped excerpts, 2018

Tramontane, looped excerpts, 2018